Sabbasava Sutta: All the Fermentations



I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying at Savatthi, in Jeta's Grove,Anathapindika's monastery. There he addressed the monks: "Monks!"

"Yes, lord," the monks replied.

The Blessed One said, "Monks, the ending of the fermentations is for one who knows & sees, I tell you, not for one who does not know & does not see. For one who knows what & sees what? Appropriate attention & inappropriate attention. When a monk attends inappropriately, unarisen fermentations arise, and arisen fermentations increase. When a monk attends appropriately, unarisen fermentations do not arise, and arisen fermentations are abandoned. There are fermentations to be abandoned by seeing, those to be abandoned by restraining, those to be abandoned by using, those to be abandoned by tolerating, those to be abandoned by avoiding, those to be abandoned by dispelling, and those to be abandoned by developing.

"[1] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by seeing? There is the case where an uninstructed, run-of-the-mill person — who has no regard for noble ones, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma; who has no regard for men of integrity, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma — does not discern what ideas are fit for attention or what ideas are unfit for attention. This being so, he does not attend to ideas fit for attention and attends [instead] to ideas unfit for attention.

"And what are the ideas unfit for attention that he attends to? Whatever ideas such that, when he attends to them, the unarisen fermentation of sensuality arises in him, and the arisen fermentation of sensuality increases; the unarisen fermentation of becoming arises in him, and arisen fermentation of becoming increases; the unarisen fermentation of ignorance arises in him, and the arisen fermentation of ignorance increases. These are the ideas unfit for attention that he attends to.

"And what are the ideas fit for attention that he does not attend to? Whatever ideas such that, when he attends to them, the unarisen fermentation of sensuality does not arise in him, and the arisen fermentation of sensuality is abandoned; the unarisen fermentation of becoming does not arise in him, and arisen fermentation of becoming is abandoned; the unarisen fermentation of ignorance does not arise in him, and the arisen fermentation of ignorance is abandoned. These are the ideas fit for attention that he does not attend to. Through his attending to ideas unfit for attention and through his not attending to ideas fit for attention, both unarisen fermentations arise in him, and arisen fermentations increase.

"This is how he attends inappropriately: 'Was I in the past? Was I not in the past? What was I in the past? How was I in the past? Having been what, what was I in the past? Shall I be in the future? Shall I not be in the future? What shall I be in the future? How shall I be in the future? Having been what, what shall I be in the future?' Or else he is inwardly perplexed about the immediate present: 'Am I? Am I not? What am I? How am I? Where has this being come from? Where is it bound?'

"As he attends inappropriately in this way, one of six kinds of view arises in him: The view I have a self arises in him as true & established, or the view I have no self... or the view It is precisely by means of self that I perceive self... or the view It is precisely by means of self that I perceive not-self... or the view It is precisely by means of not-self that I perceive selfarises in him as true & established, or else he has a view like this: This very self of mine — the knower that is sensitive here & there to the ripening of good & bad actions — is the self of mine that is constant, everlasting, eternal, not subject to change, and will stay just as it is for eternity. This is called a thicket of views, a wilderness of views, a contortion of views, a writhing of views, a fetter of views. Bound by a fetter of views, the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person is not freed from birth, aging, & death, from sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair. He is not freed, I tell you, from suffering & stress.

"The well-instructed disciple of the noble ones — who has regard for noble ones, is well-versed & disciplined in their Dhamma; who has regard for men of integrity, is well-versed & disciplined in their Dhamma — discerns what ideas are fit for attention and what ideas are unfit for attention. This being so, he does not attend to ideas unfit for attention and attends [instead] to ideas fit for attention.

"And what are the ideas unfit for attention that he does not attend to? Whatever ideas such that, when he attends to them, the unarisen fermentation of sensuality arises in him, and the arisen fermentation of sensuality increases; the unarisen fermentation of becoming arises in him, and arisen fermentation of becoming increases; the unarisen fermentation of ignorance arises in him, and the arisen fermentation of ignorance increases. These are the ideas unfit for attention that he does not attend to.

"And what are the ideas fit for attention that he does attend to? Whatever ideas such that, when he attends to them, the unarisen fermentation of sensuality does not arise in him, and the arisen fermentation of sensuality is abandoned; the unarisen fermentation of becoming does not arise in him, and the arisen fermentation of becoming is abandoned; the unarisen fermentation of ignorance does not arise in him, and the arisen fermentation of ignorance is abandoned. These are the ideas fit for attention that he does attend to. Through his not attending to ideas unfit for attention and through his attending to ideas fit for attention, unarisen fermentations do not arise in him, and arisen fermentations are abandoned.

"He attends appropriately, This is stress... This is the origination of stress... This is the cessation of stress... This is the way leading to the cessation of stress. As he attends appropriately in this way, three fetters are abandoned in him: identity-view, doubt, and grasping at precepts & practices. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by seeing.

"[2] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by restraining? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, dwells restrained with the restraint of the eye-faculty. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were to dwell unrestrained with the restraint of the eye-faculty do not arise for him when he dwells restrained with the restraint of the eye-faculty.

Reflecting appropriately, he dwells restrained with the restraint of the ear-faculty...

Reflecting appropriately, he dwells restrained with the restraint of the nose-faculty...

Reflecting appropriately, he dwells restrained with the restraint of the tongue-faculty...

Reflecting appropriately, he dwells restrained with the restraint of the body-faculty...

Reflecting appropriately, he dwells restrained with the restraint of the intellect-faculty. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were to dwell unrestrained with the restraint of the intellect-faculty do not arise for him when he dwells restrained with the restraint of the intellect-faculty. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by restraining.

"[3] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by using? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, uses the robe simply to counteract cold, to counteract heat, to counteract the touch of flies, mosquitoes, wind, sun, & reptiles; simply for the purpose of covering the parts of the body that cause shame.

"Reflecting appropriately, he uses almsfood, not playfully, nor for intoxication, nor for putting on bulk, nor for beautification; but simply for the survival & continuance of this body, for ending its afflictions, for the support of the holy life, thinking, 'Thus will I destroy old feelings [of hunger] and not create new feelings [from overeating]. I will maintain myself, be blameless, & live in comfort.'

"Reflecting appropriately, he uses lodging simply to counteract cold, to counteract heat, to counteract the touch of flies, mosquitoes, wind, sun, & reptiles; simply for protection from the inclemencies of weather and for the enjoyment of seclusion.

"Reflecting appropriately, he uses medicinal requisites that are used for curing the sick simply to counteract any pains of illness that have arisen and for maximum freedom from disease.

"The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to use these things [in this way] do not arise for him when he uses them [in this way]. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by using.

"[4] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by tolerating? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, endures. He tolerates cold, heat, hunger, & thirst; the touch of flies, mosquitoes, wind, sun, & reptiles; ill-spoken, unwelcome words & bodily feelings that, when they arise, are painful, racking, sharp, piercing, disagreeable, displeasing, & menacing to life. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to tolerate these things do not arise for him when he tolerates them. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by tolerating.

"[5] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by avoiding? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, avoids a wild elephant, a wild horse, a wild bull, a wild dog, a snake, a stump, a bramble patch, a chasm, a cliff, a cesspool, an open sewer. Reflecting appropriately, he avoids sitting in the sorts of unsuitable seats, wandering to the sorts of unsuitable habitats, and associating with the sorts of bad friends that would make his knowledgeable friends in the holy life suspect him of evil conduct. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to avoid these things do not arise for him when he avoids them. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by avoiding.

"[6] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by destroying? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, does not tolerate an arisen thought of sensuality. He abandons it, dispels it, & wipes it out of existence.

Reflecting appropriately, he does not tolerate an arisen thought of ill will...

Reflecting appropriately, he does not tolerate an arisen thought of cruelty...

Reflecting appropriately, he does not tolerate arisen evil, unskillful mental qualities. He abandons them, dispels them, & wipes them out of existence. The effluents, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to dispel these things do not arise for him when he dispels them. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by dispelling.

"[7] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by developing? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, develops mindfulness as a factor for Awakening dependent on seclusion... dispassion... cessation, resulting in letting go. He developsanalysis of qualities as a factor for Awakening... persistence as a factor for Awakening...rapture as a factor for Awakening... serenity as a factor for Awakening... concentration as a factor for Awakening... equanimity as a factor for Awakening dependent on seclusion... dispassion... cessation, resulting in letting go. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to develop these qualities do not arise for him when he develops them. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by developing.

"When a monk's fermentations that should be abandoned by seeing have been abandoned by seeing, his fermentations that should be abandoned by restraining have been abandoned by restraining, his fermentations that should be abandoned by using have been abandoned by using, his fermentations that should be abandoned by tolerating have been abandoned by tolerating, his fermentations that should be abandoned by avoiding have been abandoned by avoiding, his fermentations that should be abandoned by dispelling have been abandoned by dispelling, his fermentations that should be abandoned by developing have been abandoned by developing, then he is called a monk who dwells restrained with the restraint of all the fermentations. He has severed craving, thrown off the fetters, and — through the right penetration of conceit — has made an end of suffering & stress."

 

That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, the monks delighted in the Blessed One's words.

Sabbāsavasuttaṃ

14. Evaṃ me sutaṃ – ekaṃ samayaṃ bhagavā sāvatthiyaṃ viharati jetavane anāthapiṇḍikassa ārāme. Tatra kho bhagavā bhikkhū āmantesi – ‘‘bhikkhavo’’ti. ‘‘Bhadante’’ti te bhikkhū bhagavato paccassosuṃ. Bhagavā etadavoca – ‘‘sabbāsavasaṃvarapariyāyaṃ vo, bhikkhave, desessāmi. Taṃ suṇātha , sādhukaṃ manasi karotha, bhāsissāmī’’ti. ‘‘Evaṃ, bhante’’ti kho te bhikkhū bhagavato paccassosuṃ. Bhagavā etadavoca –

15. ‘‘Jānato ahaṃ, bhikkhave, passato āsavānaṃ khayaṃ vadāmi, no ajānato no apassato. Kiñca, bhikkhave, jānato kiñca passato āsavānaṃ khayaṃ vadāmi? Yoniso ca manasikāraṃ ayoniso ca manasikāraṃ. Ayoniso, bhikkhave, manasikaroto anuppannā ceva āsavā uppajjanti, uppannā ca āsavā pavaḍḍhanti; yoniso ca kho, bhikkhave, manasikaroto anuppannā ceva āsavā na uppajjanti, uppannā ca āsavā pahīyanti.

16. ‘‘Atthi, bhikkhave, āsavā dassanā pahātabbā, atthi āsavā saṃvarā pahātabbā, atthi āsavā paṭisevanā pahātabbā, atthi āsavā adhivāsanā pahātabbā, atthi āsavā parivajjanā pahātabbā, atthi āsavā vinodanā pahātabbā, atthi āsavā bhāvanā pahātabbā.

Dassanā pahātabbāsavā

17. ‘‘Katame ca, bhikkhave, āsavā dassanā pahātabbā? Idha, bhikkhave , assutavā puthujjano – ariyānaṃ adassāvī ariyadhammassa akovido ariyadhamme avinīto, sappurisānaṃ adassāvī sappurisadhammassa akovido sappurisadhamme avinīto – manasikaraṇīye dhamme nappajānāti, amanasikaraṇīye dhamme nappajānāti. So manasikaraṇīye dhamme appajānanto amanasikaraṇīye dhamme appajānanto, ye dhammā na manasikaraṇīyā, te dhamme manasi karoti, ye dhammā manasikaraṇīyā te dhamme na manasi karoti.

‘‘Katame ca, bhikkhave, dhammā na manasikaraṇīyā ye dhamme manasi karoti? Yassa, bhikkhave, dhamme manasikaroto anuppanno vā kāmāsavo uppajjati, uppanno vā kāmāsavo pavaḍḍhati; anuppanno vā bhavāsavo uppajjati, uppanno vā bhavāsavo pavaḍḍhati; anuppanno vā avijjāsavo uppajjati, uppanno vā avijjāsavo pavaḍḍhati – ime dhammā na manasikaraṇīyā ye dhamme manasi karoti.

‘‘Katame ca, bhikkhave, dhammā manasikaraṇīyā ye dhamme na manasi karoti? Yassa, bhikkhave, dhamme manasikaroto anuppanno vā kāmāsavo na uppajjati, uppanno vā kāmāsavo pahīyati; anuppanno vā bhavāsavo na uppajjati, uppanno vā bhavāsavo pahīyati; anuppanno vā avijjāsavo na uppajjati, uppanno vā avijjāsavo pahīyati – ime dhammā manasikaraṇīyā ye dhamme na manasi karoti.

‘‘Tassa amanasikaraṇīyānaṃ dhammānaṃ manasikārā manasikaraṇīyānaṃ dhammānaṃ amanasikārā anuppannā ceva āsavā uppajjanti uppannā ca āsavā pavaḍḍhanti.

18. ‘‘So evaṃ ayoniso manasi karoti – ‘ahosiṃ nu kho ahaṃ atītamaddhānaṃ? Na nu kho ahosiṃ atītamaddhānaṃ? Kiṃ nu kho ahosiṃ atītamaddhānaṃ? Kathaṃ nu kho ahosiṃ atītamaddhānaṃ? Kiṃ hutvā kiṃ ahosiṃ nu kho ahaṃ atītamaddhānaṃ? Bhavissāmi nu kho ahaṃ anāgatamaddhānaṃ? Na nu kho bhavissāmi anāgatamaddhānaṃ? Kiṃ nu kho bhavissāmi anāgatamaddhānaṃ? Kathaṃ nu kho bhavissāmi anāgatamaddhānaṃ? Kiṃ hutvā kiṃ bhavissāmi nu kho ahaṃ anāgatamaddhāna’nti? Etarahi vā paccuppannamaddhānaṃ[paccuppannamaddhānaṃ ārabbha (syā.)] ajjhattaṃ kathaṃkathī hoti – ‘ahaṃ nu khosmi? No nu khosmi? Kiṃ nu khosmi? Kathaṃ nu khosmi? Ayaṃ nu kho satto kuto āgato? So kuhiṃ gāmī bhavissatī’ti?

19. ‘‘Tassa evaṃ ayoniso manasikaroto channaṃ diṭṭhīnaṃ aññatarā diṭṭhi uppajjati. ‘Atthi me attā’ti vā assa [vāssa (sī. syā. pī.)] saccato thetato diṭṭhi uppajjati; ‘natthi me attā’ti vā assa saccato thetato diṭṭhi uppajjati; ‘attanāva attānaṃ sañjānāmī’ti vā assa saccato thetato diṭṭhi uppajjati; ‘attanāva anattānaṃ sañjānāmī’ti vā assa saccato thetato diṭṭhi uppajjati; ‘anattanāva attānaṃ sañjānāmī’ti vā assa saccato thetato diṭṭhi uppajjati; atha vā panassa evaṃ diṭṭhi hoti – ‘yo me ayaṃ attā vado vedeyyo tatra tatra kalyāṇapāpakānaṃ kammānaṃ vipākaṃ paṭisaṃvedeti so kho pana me ayaṃ attā nicco dhuvo sassato avipariṇāmadhammo sassatisamaṃ tatheva ṭhassatī’ti. Idaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave , diṭṭhigataṃ diṭṭhigahanaṃ diṭṭhikantāraṃ diṭṭhivisūkaṃ diṭṭhivipphanditaṃ diṭṭhisaṃyojanaṃ. Diṭṭhisaṃyojanasaṃyutto, bhikkhave, assutavā puthujjano na parimuccati jātiyā jarāya maraṇena sokehi paridevehi dukkhehi domanassehi upāyāsehi; ‘na parimuccati dukkhasmā’ti vadāmi.

20. ‘‘Sutavā ca kho, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako – ariyānaṃ dassāvī ariyadhammassa kovido ariyadhamme suvinīto, sappurisānaṃ dassāvī sappurisadhammassa kovido sappurisadhamme suvinīto – manasikaraṇīye dhamme pajānāti amanasikaraṇīye dhamme pajānāti. So manasikaraṇīye dhamme pajānanto amanasikaraṇīye dhamme pajānanto ye dhammā na manasikaraṇīyā te dhamme na manasi karoti, ye dhammā manasikaraṇīyā te dhamme manasi karoti.

‘‘Katame ca, bhikkhave, dhammā na manasikaraṇīyā ye dhamme na manasi karoti? Yassa, bhikkhave, dhamme manasikaroto anuppanno vā kāmāsavo uppajjati, uppanno vā kāmāsavo pavaḍḍhati; anuppanno vā bhavāsavo uppajjati, uppanno vā bhavāsavo pavaḍḍhati; anuppanno vā avijjāsavo uppajjati, uppanno vā avijjāsavo pavaḍḍhati – ime dhammā na manasikaraṇīyā, ye dhamme na manasi karoti.

‘‘Katame ca, bhikkhave, dhammā manasikaraṇīyā ye dhamme manasi karoti? Yassa, bhikkhave, dhamme manasikaroto anuppanno vā kāmāsavo na uppajjati, uppanno vā kāmāsavo pahīyati; anuppanno vā bhavāsavo na uppajjati , uppanno vā bhavāsavo pahīyati; anuppanno vā avijjāsavo na uppajjati, uppanno vā avijjāsavo pahīyati – ime dhammā manasikaraṇīyā ye dhamme manasi karoti.

‘‘Tassa amanasikaraṇīyānaṃ dhammānaṃ amanasikārā manasikaraṇīyānaṃ dhammānaṃ manasikārā anuppannā ceva āsavā na uppajjanti, uppannā ca āsavā pahīyanti.

21. ‘‘So ‘idaṃ dukkha’nti yoniso manasi karoti, ‘ayaṃ dukkhasamudayo’ti yoniso manasi karoti, ‘ayaṃ dukkhanirodho’ti yoniso manasi karoti, ‘ayaṃ dukkhanirodhagāminī paṭipadā’ti yoniso manasi karoti. Tassa evaṃ yoniso manasikaroto tīṇi saṃyojanāni pahīyanti – sakkāyadiṭṭhi, vicikicchā, sīlabbataparāmāso. Ime vuccanti, bhikkhave, āsavā dassanā pahātabbā.

Saṃvarā pahātabbāsavā

22. ‘‘Katame ca, bhikkhave, āsavā saṃvarā pahātabbā? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu paṭisaṅkhā yoniso cakkhundriyasaṃvarasaṃvuto viharati. Yañhissa, bhikkhave, cakkhundriyasaṃvaraṃ asaṃvutassa viharato uppajjeyyuṃ āsavā vighātapariḷāhā, cakkhundriyasaṃvaraṃ saṃvutassa viharato evaṃsa te āsavā vighātapariḷāhā na honti. Paṭisaṅkhā yoniso sotindriyasaṃvarasaṃvuto viharati…pe… ghānindriyasaṃvarasaṃvuto viharati…pe… jivhindriyasaṃvarasaṃvuto viharati…pe… kāyindriyasaṃvarasaṃvuto viharati…pe… manindriyasaṃvarasaṃvuto viharati. Yañhissa, bhikkhave , manindriyasaṃvaraṃ asaṃvutassa viharato uppajjeyyuṃ āsavā vighātapariḷāhā, manindriyasaṃvaraṃ saṃvutassa viharato evaṃsa te āsavā vighātapariḷāhā na honti.

‘‘Yañhissa, bhikkhave, saṃvaraṃ asaṃvutassa viharato uppajjeyyuṃ āsavā vighātapariḷāhā , saṃvaraṃ saṃvutassa viharato evaṃsa te āsavā vighātapariḷāhā na honti. Ime vuccanti, bhikkhave, āsavā saṃvarā pahātabbā.

Paṭisevanā pahātabbāsavā

23. ‘‘Katame ca, bhikkhave, āsavā paṭisevanā pahātabbā? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu paṭisaṅkhā yoniso cīvaraṃ paṭisevati – ‘yāvadeva sītassa paṭighātāya, uṇhassa paṭighātāya, ḍaṃsamakasavātātapasarīṃsapa- [siriṃsapa (sī. syā. pī.)] samphassānaṃ paṭighātāya, yāvadeva hirikopīnappaṭicchādanatthaṃ’.

‘‘Paṭisaṅkhā yoniso piṇḍapātaṃ paṭisevati – ‘neva davāya, na madāya, na maṇḍanāya, na vibhūsanāya, yāvadeva imassa kāyassa ṭhitiyā yāpanāya, vihiṃsūparatiyā, brahmacariyānuggahāya, iti purāṇañca vedanaṃ paṭihaṅkhāmi navañca vedanaṃ na uppādessāmi, yātrā ca me bhavissati anavajjatā ca phāsuvihāro ca’ [cāti (sī.)].

‘‘Paṭisaṅkhā yoniso senāsanaṃ paṭisevati – ‘yāvadeva sītassa paṭighātāya, uṇhassa paṭighātāya, ḍaṃsamakasavātātapasarīṃsapasamphassānaṃ paṭighātāya, yāvadeva utuparissayavinodanapaṭisallānārāmatthaṃ’.

‘‘Paṭisaṅkhā yoniso gilānappaccayabhesajjaparikkhāraṃ paṭisevati – ‘yāvadeva uppannānaṃ veyyābādhikānaṃ vedanānaṃ paṭighātāya, abyābajjhaparamatāya’ [abyāpajjhaparamatāya (sī. syā. pī.), abyāpajjaparamatāya (ka.)].

‘‘Yañhissa, bhikkhave, appaṭisevato uppajjeyyuṃ āsavā vighātapariḷāhā, paṭisevato evaṃsa te āsavā vighātapariḷāhā na honti. Ime vuccanti, bhikkhave, āsavā paṭisevanā pahātabbā.

Adhivāsanā pahātabbāsavā

24. ‘‘Katame ca, bhikkhave, āsavā adhivāsanā pahātabbā? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu paṭisaṅkhā yoniso khamo hoti sītassa uṇhassa, jighacchāya pipāsāya. Ḍaṃsamakasavātātapasarīṃsapasamphassānaṃ, duruttānaṃ durāgatānaṃ vacanapathānaṃ, uppannānaṃ sārīrikānaṃ vedanānaṃ dukkhānaṃ tibbānaṃ [tippānaṃ (sī. syā. pī.)] kharānaṃ kaṭukānaṃ asātānaṃ amanāpānaṃ pāṇaharānaṃ adhivāsakajātiko hoti.

‘‘Yañhissa, bhikkhave, anadhivāsayato uppajjeyyuṃ āsavā vighātapariḷāhā, adhivāsayato evaṃsa te āsavā vighātapariḷāhā na honti. Ime vuccanti, bhikkhave, āsavā adhivāsanā pahātabbā.

Parivajjanā pahātabbāsavā

25. ‘‘Katame ca, bhikkhave, āsavā parivajjanā pahātabbā? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu paṭisaṅkhā yoniso caṇḍaṃ hatthiṃ parivajjeti, caṇḍaṃ assaṃ parivajjeti, caṇḍaṃ goṇaṃ parivajjeti, caṇḍaṃ kukkuraṃ parivajjeti, ahiṃ khāṇuṃ kaṇṭakaṭṭhānaṃ sobbhaṃ papātaṃ candanikaṃ oḷigallaṃ. Yathārūpe anāsane nisinnaṃ yathārūpe agocare carantaṃ yathārūpe pāpake mitte bhajantaṃ viññū sabrahmacārī pāpakesu ṭhānesu okappeyyuṃ, so tañca anāsanaṃ tañca agocaraṃ te ca pāpake mitte paṭisaṅkhā yoniso parivajjeti.

‘‘Yañhissa, bhikkhave, aparivajjayato uppajjeyyuṃ āsavā vighātapariḷāhā, parivajjayato evaṃsa te āsavā vighātapariḷāhā na honti. Ime vuccanti, bhikkhave, āsavā parivajjanā pahātabbā.

Vinodanā pahātabbāsavā

26. ‘‘Katame ca, bhikkhave, āsavā vinodanā pahātabbā? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu paṭisaṅkhā yoniso uppannaṃ kāmavitakkaṃ nādhivāseti pajahati vinodeti byantīkaroti anabhāvaṃ gameti, uppannaṃ byāpādavitakkaṃ…pe… uppannaṃ vihiṃsāvitakkaṃ…pe… uppannuppanne pāpake akusale dhamme nādhivāseti pajahati vinodeti byantīkaroti anabhāvaṃ gameti.

‘‘Yañhissa, bhikkhave, avinodayato uppajjeyyuṃ āsavā vighātapariḷāhā, vinodayato evaṃsa te āsavā vighātapariḷāhā na honti. Ime vuccanti, bhikkhave, āsavā vinodanā pahātabbā.

Bhāvanā pahātabbāsavā

27. ‘‘Katame ca, bhikkhave, āsavā bhāvanā pahātabbā? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu paṭisaṅkhā yoniso satisambojjhaṅgaṃ bhāveti vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ; paṭisaṅkhā yoniso dhammavicayasambojjhaṅgaṃ bhāveti…pe… vīriyasambojjhaṅgaṃ bhāveti… pītisambojjhaṅgaṃ bhāveti… passaddhisambojjhaṅgaṃ bhāveti… samādhisambojjhaṅgaṃ bhāveti… upekkhāsambojjhaṅgaṃ bhāveti vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ.

‘‘Yañhissa, bhikkhave , abhāvayato uppajjeyyuṃ āsavā vighātapariḷāhā, bhāvayato evaṃsa te āsavā vighātapariḷāhā na honti. Ime vuccanti, bhikkhave, āsavā bhāvanā pahātabbā.

28. ‘‘Yato kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhuno ye āsavā dassanā pahātabbā te dassanā pahīnā honti, ye āsavā saṃvarā pahātabbā te saṃvarā pahīnā honti, ye āsavā paṭisevanā pahātabbā te paṭisevanā pahīnā honti, ye āsavā adhivāsanā pahātabbā te adhivāsanā pahīnā honti, ye āsavā parivajjanā pahātabbā te parivajjanā pahīnā honti, ye āsavā vinodanā pahātabbā te vinodanā pahīnā honti, ye āsavā bhāvanā pahātabbā te bhāvanā pahīnā honti; ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave – ‘bhikkhu sabbāsavasaṃvarasaṃvuto viharati, acchecchi [acchejji (ka.)] taṇhaṃ, vivattayi[vāvattayi (sī. pī.)] saṃyojanaṃ, sammā mānābhisamayā antamakāsi dukkhassā’’’ti.

Idamavoca bhagavā. Attamanā te bhikkhū bhagavato bhāsitaṃ abhinandunti.

Sabbāsavasuttaṃ niṭṭhitaṃ dutiyaṃ.

Sabbàsavasuttaü 
All Desires



I heard thus:



At one time the Blessed One lived in the monasatery offered by Anàthapiõóika in Jeta's grove in Sàvatthi.



There, the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus: ‘Monks, I will teach the method of restraining the mind from all desires, listen and attend carefully.



Bhikkhus, I declare the restraining of the mind from all desires, knowing and seeing, not without knowing and seeing. Knowing and seeing, what is it? `Knowing and seeing with wise attention and with unwise attention.' When attending unwisely non-arisen desires arise, and arisen desires grow. When attending wisely non-arisen desires do not arise, and arisen desires fade. Bhikkhus, there are desires to be turned out reflecting wisely, there are desires to be turned out with restraint, there are desires to be turned out by indulging, there are desires to be turned out by enduring, there are desires to be turned out by avoiding, and there are desires to be turned out by dispelling, and there are desires to be turned out by development.



Bhikkhus, what desires should be turned out reflecting wisely? Here, bhikkhus, the ordinary man has not seen Noble Ones and Great Men, not clever and not tamed in their teaching, does not know the thoughts that should be thought and should not be thought. So he thinks thoughts that should not be thought and does not think thoughts that should be thought. Bhikkhus, what thoughts that should not be thought are thought? Those thoughts that arouse non-arisen sensual desires, and thoughts that develop arisen sensual desires. Those thoughts that arouse non-arisen desires `to be' and thoughts that develop arisen desires `to be'. Those thoughts that arouse non-arisen desires of ignorance and thoughts that develop arisen desires of ignorance. These thoughts that should not be thought are thought.



Bhikkhus, what thoughts that should be thought are not thought? They are those thoughts that do not arouse non-arisen sensual desires and thoughts that diminish arisen sensual desires, those thoughts that do not arouse non-arisen desires `to be' and thoughts that diminish arisen desires `to be', and those thoughts that do not arouse non-arisen desires of ignorance and thoughts that diminish arisen desires of ignorance. These thoughts that should be thought are not thought. Thinking thoughts that should not be thought, and not thinking thoughts that should be thought, non-arisen desires arise and arisen desires develop.



He thinks unwisely in this manner: `Was I in the past or wasn't I in the past? Who was I in the past? How was I in the past? Become who and who was I in the past? Will I be in the future, or will I not be in the future? What will I be in the future? How will I be in the future? Who will I become and who will I be in the future?'



Or doubts arise about the self in the present : ‘Am I, or am I not? What am I? How am I ? From where did this being come, where will it go?' To whoever thinking unwisely in this manner, one of these six views arises: To him a view arises perfect and clear, `I have a self.' Or, `I have no self.' Or, `with the self I know the self.' Or, `with the self I know the no-self.' Or, `with no-self I know the no-self.' Or this view arises to him: `This my self which speaks and feels and experiences the results of good and bad actions done here and there; it is permanent and eternal and would not change.' Bhikkhus, this is called the soul view, the thicket of speculations, the wilderness of speculations, the bond of views. O! Bhikkhus, the ordinary man bound by these views is not released from birth, decay, death, sorrow, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress. He is not released from unpleasantness, I say.



Bhikkhus, the learned disciple who has seen Noble Ones and Great Men, clever and trained in their Teaching, knows the thoughts that should be thought and knows the thoughts that should not be thought. He does not think thoughts that should not be thought, and he thinks thoughts that should be thought.



What are the thoughts that should not be thought? Those thoughts that arouse non-arisen sensual desires and develop arisen sensual desires. Those thoughts that arouse non-arisen desires `to be' and develop arisen desires `to be' Those thoughts that arouse non-arisen desires of ignorance and develop arisen desires of ignorance. These thoughts should not be thought.



What are the thoughts that should be thought? Those thoughts that do not arouse non-arisen sensual desires and diminish arisen sensual desires. Those thoughts that do not arouse non-arisen desires to `to be' and diminish arisen desires `to be'. Those thoughts that do not arouse non-arisen desires of ignorance and diminish arisen desires of ignorance. These thoughts should be thought.



When he does not think thoughts that should not be thought and thinks those that should be thought, non-arisen desires do not arise and arisen desires fade. Then he wisely thinks, `This is unpleasant,' wisely thinks, This is the arising of unpleasantness,' wisely thinks, `This is the cessation of unpleasantness,' and wisely thinks, `This is the path to the cessation of unpleasantness'. When he thinks in this manner three bonds fade away: the view about a self, doubts, and the bindings of virtues. Bhikkhus, these are the desires that should be dispelled by wise thinking.



Bhikkhus, what desires should be turned out through restraint? Here, the bhikkhu wisely reflecting abides restrained in the mental faculty of the eye. To one abiding unrestrained in the mental faculty of the eye would arise desires of distress and burning; to one restrained they do not arise. The bhikkhu wisely reflecting abides restrained in the mental faculty of the ear. To one abiding unrestrained in the mental faculty of the ear would arise desires of distress and burning, to one restrained they do not arise. The bhikkhu wisely reflecting abides restrained in the mental faculty of the nose. To one abiding unrestrained in the mental faculty of the nose would arise desires of distress and burning, to one restrained they do not arise. The bhikkhu wisely reflecting abides restrained in the mental faculty of the tongue. To one abiding unrestrained in the mental faculty of the tongue would arise desires of distress and burning, to one restrained they do not arise. The bhikkhu wisely reflecting abides restrained in the mental faculty of the body. To one abiding unrestrained in the mental faculty of the body would arise desires of distress and burning, to one restrained they do not arise. The bhikkhu wisely reflecting abides restrained in the mental faculty of the mind. To one abiding unrestrained in the mental faculty of the mind would arise desires of distress and burning, to one restrained they do not arise. Bhikkhus, to one abiding restrained, desires of distress and burning do not arise. These are the desires that should be turned out through restraint.



Bhikkhus, what desires should be turned out through indulging? Here, the bhikkhu wisely reflecting uses the robe to ward off cold, heat, the stings of gadflies and yellow flies, to ward off the heat of the air and the touch of creeping things and for the purpose of covering the loins out of shame. Wisely reflcting, partakes of the morsel food, not for play, for intoxication or to look beautiful, [but] to support the body, without greed for tastes, as support to lead the holy life. While partaking the food reflects `Giving up the earlier feelings would not arouse new, may it be for a faultless light living'. Wisely reflecting, partakes the dwelling to ward off the cold, heat, the sting of gadflies and yellow flies, to ward off the burning air, creeping things, and to end the troubles from the seasons, and for seclusion. Wisely reflecting, partakes requisites when ill to ward off oppressive feelings. When not using them may arise desires of distress and burning, using them they would not arise. Bhikkhus, these are the desires that should be turned out by indulging.



Bhikkhus, what desires should be turned out by enduring? Here, the bhikkhu wisely reflecting endures cold, heat, hunger, thirst, the sting of gadflies, yellow flies, heat of the air, the touch of creeping things, the piercing touch of badly enunciated words, sharp rough piercing bodily feelings and unwelcome, disagreeable feelings that end life. To one not enduring these may arise desires of burning and distress, to one enduring them desires do not arise. These are the desires that should be turned out by enduring.



Bhikkhus, what desires should be turned out by avoiding? Here the bhikkhu, wisely reflecting avoids rough elephants, horses, bulls, dogs, serpents, uneven thorny roads, pits, depresssions, pools, and village pools. And sitting on unsuitable seats, pasturing on unsuitable pastures and associating evil friends, these which the wise co-associates in the holy life denounce, he wisely reflecting should avoid. Bhikkhus, to one not avoiding these may arise desires of burning and distress, to one avoiding them desires do not arise. These desires should be turned out by avoiding.



`Bhikkhus, what desires should be turned out by dispelling? Here, the bhikkhu reflecting wisely does not entertain arisen sensual thoughts, dispels them, does not let them rise again; reflecting wisely does not entertain arisen angry thoughts, dispels them, does not let them rise again; reflecting wisely, does not entertain arisen hurting thoughts, dispels them, does not let them rise again; and reflecting wisely does not entertain whatever arisen demeritorious evil thoughts, dispels them, does not let them rise again. Bhikkhus, to one not dispelling these may arise desires and burning, [but] to one dispelling them desires do not arise. These desires should be turned out by dispelling.



Bhikkhus, what desires should be turned out by development? Here, the bhikkhu wisely reflecting develops the enlightenment factor mindfulness based on seclusion, detachment and cessation and ending in surrender Wisely reflecting, he develops the enlightenment factor investigation of the Teaching based on seclusion, detachment, and cessation, and ending in surrender; Wisely reflecting, he develops the enlightenment factor effort based on seclusion, detachment and cessation and ending in surrender. Wisely reflecting, he develops develops the enlightenment factor joy based on seclusion, detachment and ending in surrender. Wisely reflecting, he develops the enlightenment factor tranquillity based on seclusion, detachment and cessation and ending in surrender. Wisely reflecting, he develops the enlightenment factor concentration based on seclusion, detachment and cessation and ending in surrender. And Wisely reflecting, he develops the enlightenment factor equanimity based on seclusion, detachment and cessation and ending in surrender. Bhikkhus, to one not developing these may arise desires of burning and distress, to one developing them these desires do not arise. These desires should be turned out by development.



Bhikkhus, when the bhikkhu turns out those desires which should be turned out by wise reflection, turns out those desires that should be turned out by restraint, turns out those desires that should be turned out by indulging, turns out those desires that should be turned out by enduring, turns out those desires that should be turned out by avoiding, turns out those desires that should be turned out by dispelling and turns out those desires that should be turned out by development, it is said that the bhikkhu, abiding restrained in all desires, has overcome craving, dispensed the bonds, and rightfully ending measuring made an end of unpleasantness.’



 

The Blessed One said thus and those bhikkhus delighted in the words of the Blessed One.